Plan to Sell Off Rest Garden Dedicated to Founder of Open Spaces Association

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William Henry Thomas (founder of the Middlesbrough District and Betterment and Open Spaces Association) began his career as a manager stationer in 1881 and by 1911 he was the Managing Director of Jordison and Co, whose building adjoined what is now The House of Blah Blah and Teesside Archives.

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William Henry Thomas specialised in archaeology, botany and philosophy and was also linked with recruitment during the First World War. “A Lover of the Good, the True & The beautiful” his memorial plaque and monument was revealed on 2nd October 1934 at a public celebration. The Mayor attended and it was said that the rest garden was for the purpose of “beautifying the brick pond on the Whinney Banks side of Acklam-road.” The original brochure from the opening contains a covenant between the Corporation of Middlesbrough and the donors which states that the monument shall not be moved or obstructed in any way and that “the Corporation shall at all times keep the said open space as a garden and shrubbery.”

On 26th January 2015, it was decided by Middlesbrough Borough Council Executive Sub-Committee for Property that the rest garden on Acklam Road was to be sold off for commercial development. A supermarket chain have expressed interest in the site, but no formal planning application has been made.

The minutes from the meeting show that the sale of the land “will result in the disposal of surplus property in return for the capital receipt to the Council and assist in the regeneration and enhancement of the local area”.

Taken from the minutes from the meeting on the 26th January:

ORDERED

1.    That the sale of the land to the preferred developer at the cost outlined within the report be approved by Executive Sub Committee for Property;

2.    That an update on the progress be brought back to a future Executive Sub Committee for Property Panel; and

3.    That if the sale of the land did not proceed in accordance with the above recommendation, the subsequent decision on how to proceed with the disposal, in consultation with the Executive Director, Economic Development and Communities be delegated to the Executive Director, Commercial and Corporate Services.

If a planning application is made, the public will have 21 days to object. This can be done through the council website “search & track”.

Hands on Middlesbrough have applied to Historic England to list the William Henry Thomas memorial and it is currently going through an initial assessment.

Planning process – planning reasons for considering an objection

 

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When making comments on any planning application, all reasons you give must be planning reasons. So as to assist with your comments I have put together a tick list of valid planning reasons for objecting to any planning application:

Site considerations

  • over development
  • insufficient garden or amenity land
  • lack of private space
  • excessive bulk or scale
  • introducing unnatural features
  • spoiling natural or existing contours
  • incompatible with the design of existing buildings
  • loss of important trees, hedge or other vegetation
  • threatening a public right of way
  • insufficient parking spaces
  • failure to meet council’s access and on-site turning standards
  • loss of important wildlife habitats
  • harm to rare plants or animals
  • destroying traditional field patterns
  • loss of high-quality agricultural land
  • public sewers inadequate
  • risk of flooding or creation of flood risk
  • threat to health of occupants through previous contamination

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Planning Policy

  • conflict with LDF Core Strategy or extant Local Plan policies
  • contrary to government planning policy guidance
  • not complying with council’s informal policy guidance
  • prejudice comprehensive development of an area
  • exceptional personal circumstances

Special Designation

  • loss of important Tree Preservation Order trees [n.b. most trees in a Conservation Area are automatically subject to TPO’s
  • ‘inappropriate development’ in Green Belt
  • harm to landscape of National Park or Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty / National Scenic Area
  • threat to wildlife or geological features of Site of Special Scientific Interest
  • conflict with character of Conservation area
  • damage to historic or architectural value of listed building
  • harmful to the setting of Listed Building
  • destroying archaeological remains or monuments

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Planning history

  • losing important social beneficial uses
  • reducing housing accommodation in areas of housing shortage
  • other applications refused and no change in circumstances
  • contrary to inspector’s views in previous appeal decision
  • incompatible with existing planning permission

Neighbours

  • overlooking adjoining properties
  • overshadowing
  • blocking natural daylight
  • generating noise, disturbance, smells, pollution
  • unsociable hours of operation

Surrounding Area

  • dominating nearby buildings
  • conflict with the pattern of development
  • poor relationship with adjoining buildings
  • visually damaging in the landscape or in the setting
  • conflict with the character of the area
  • environmental damage caused by vehicles
  • inconvenience for pedestrians
  • road system is inadequate
  • prejudice highway safety
  • loss of open spaces
  • losing historic street pattern
  • adverse affect on rural economy
  • adverse effect on economy or businesses
  • loss of employment or traditional industries
  • threat to viability and vitality of town centre
  • creating imbalance between jobs and homes
  • failure to meet housing needs
  • better alternative sites available

Middlesbrough Planning Applications

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Middlesbrough Council has a public consultation process on planning applications submitted by householders and developers. The consultation allows the submission of comments or objections over a 21 day period commencing from the date the planning officer validates the application. Nearby neighbours are sent letters through the post advising them of the consultation. The application is also displayed on the Council planning website. Parish Councils and Community Councils are automatically sent a copy the applications via post or the Internet e-consult arrangement. Regardless of any delays in the post or in placing the application on the website the consultation is still a 21 day period from the date of validation.

If you are opposed to an application or any aspect of it, you can make an objection to Middlesbrough Council. Before making an objection it is advisable to discuss the application with the Council planning officer to discuss your grounds for objection. It may be something that can be changed during the application process. If this is not possible (usually not) then you have the right to submit your objection:

  • Submit your objection in writing or submit it electronically via the Council planning website to the Council’s planning department.
  • Contact other people affected by the proposal and encourage them to write letters of objection. This is more effective than a petition – even a petition with 1,000 names will only count as one objection.
  • Contact your local Ward Councillors and ask them to support you. Meet the Ward Councillors on site and put forward your grounds of objection. Speak with or write to the Parish Council or Community Council and put forward your objection for their support.
  • After the public consultation is finished the Planning officer will prepare a report to the Planning Committee advising their recommendation on either refusal or approval of the application based on existing planning policies and the input from objectors. This report is usually available for viewing on the Council planning website ten days before the Planning Committee meeting.

If you wish to speak at the Planning Committee meeting you can submit a request via the Planning Committee coordinator.

It is important that you object only on planning grounds. Objection on the grounds of devaluation of property, effects on a view or disturbance during the building work are not planning issues.

Planning Considerations

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  • Substantial damage to the amenities of residents caused by noise, disturbance, smell or loss of light.
  • The visual impact of a development – what it will be like to look at, loss of significant natural view (e.g. Roseberry Topping), Highway traffic flow and safety including the need for effective parking.
  • Any contravention of the approved policies of the Local Authority and central Government policies as set out in a wide range of Government circulars and planning policy framework/guidance notes.
  • Precedents set by decisions already taken, granting permission to applications of a similar nature elsewhere in the area (cumulative effect).
  • The existing use of the site, or any previous planning permission already granted for the site.
  • Design, materials, amenity space of the scheme etc. although the degree of control in these areas is restricted.

Planning Conditions applied to approved applications

You may agree with the application but disagree with just some of its aspects. In this case, when responding to those aspects you could ask for planning conditions to be attached to the approval for planning permission. Not necessarily objecting to a planning application but asking for any of the standard planning conditions (discuss with the Planning Officer) to be applied is known as making a representation.

The Appeal Process

There is no right of appeal by the public on a decision if the council approves a planning application with which you disagree. It is essential you must object during the 21 day consultation period. If planning permission is refused by the Planning Committee or conditions are imposed which the applicant considers are unacceptable, then the applicant has six months to appeal to the Secretary of State.

An independent Planning Inspector is then appointed to listen to both sides of the case and will either make a decision or provide a recommendation to the Secretary of State who, in some cases, will make the final decision. Appeals can be heard in three ways:

  1. Written representation – This involves the exchange of written correspondence by all parties and the opportunity to comment on each other’s case. The inspector will visit the site and usually makes a decision relatively quickly.
  2. Informal Hearing – This allows both parties to present their case to the Inspector in person, in a relaxed and informal setting.

The hearing usually takes the form of a round table discussion, followed by a site visit. A decision letter will then be issued. This usually takes a few months to complete.

  1. Public Inquiry – This follows a clear set of procedures and allows all interested parties to give evidence and cross-examine the evidence of others in a formal and “courtroom “- like setting. The Inspector will make a site visit and may either issue a decision letter or report to the Secretary of State for final decision.

At any Inquiry the local authority will seek to defend their decision that is being appealed against. The local community does have an important role to play. If you initially objected to the application you will be invited to support the local authority either in writing to the Inspector or by addressing the Hearing or Public Inquiry. This process could take a considerable number of months to complete.

If you wish either to object or to support the applicant you can put your view in writing to the Inspector and ask to attend the inquiry to give evidence. If you do speak you are likely to be questioned about your evidence, but the Inquiry is not intended to be intimidating. You would be required to just state your case simply and clearly.

Checking planning applications on the Middlesbrough Council website

From your computer enter the following weblink into your Internet browser bar http://www.middlesbrough.gov.uk/?articleid=2276

This will bring you to the Council planning ‘Search and Track’ page. Go down to the ‘Parish’ box, click on the arrow and select your Parish from the pull-down menu. Click on the ‘Search’ button. The new page will display planning applications for that particular Parish going back to the start of the computerised planning application process. There are 20 applications per page, click ‘Next’ to view previous pages.

To examine the milestone dates (consultation period and expected date for the Planning Committee meeting) and documents of a particular application click on the ‘Reference’ number. If you wish to contact the relevant planning officer for further information click on the ‘Officer’ button for the telephone number and e-mail address.

This page also allows you to comment or submit an objection electronically on the application, click on ‘Comment on this application’ and complete the electronic form.

HOME- Cannon Street on Film

Cannon Street

“Don’t build factories. This land belongs to us” (Mr Gallagher)

Hands on Middlesbrough have been working with students from Teesside University to raise £300 in just 2 weeks.

They hope to fund digitising BBC archive footage of Cannon Street. Cannon Street was one of Middlesbrough’s strongest communities, stretching from Newport Bridge to Boundary Road. The area was dominated by heavy industry and residents lived in cramped unsanitary conditions. Residents wanted new housing, but they wanted it to be built on Cannon Street, or their homes modernized. Instead they were displaced into housing estates elsewhere.

The interviews with residents from the 1960s and 1970s show how the clearance of Cannon Street and demolition of homes led to opposition within the local community.

The local Priest from the nearby Church of St Columba, talks about the “loneliness” and “boredom” experienced by people unable to adjust to life without their friends and neighbours. He states that “progress has a price” and argues that the residents are “pawns in a game”.

Home is about so much more than bricks and mortar and the archive footage shows how strongly residents felt about losing not just their homes, but their community.

Gone are the days of front doors left open, a shiny front step and kids playing in the street. This is not the Middlesbrough we know today. Yet the Cannon Street film footage is as relevant as it ever was.

Communities may be strong but can be broken as easily as homes are demolished. Buildings are easily built up again, our urban landscape alters over the years and yet community spirit is not so easy to rebuild.

Hands on Middlesbrough and the students working on the Junk to Funk Festival, hope that by raising the money to show this publicly at the end of May.

For more INFO or to DONATE please check out the Junk to Funk website http://junktofunk.co.uk/

Middlesbrough’s Listed Heritage

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Avenue Methodist Church, Acklam                   Church of St Barnabas, Linthorpe

Fishpond 550m east of Acklam Hall Scheduling Middlesbrough
Acklam Hall Listing Hall Drive, Acklam, Middlesbrough I
Coulby Manor Listing Coulby Manor, Coulby Manor Way, MIDDLESBROUGH, Middlesbrough II
Walls enclosing carpark, C30M SOUTH-WEST OF COULBY MANOR Listing C30M SOUTH-WEST OF COULBY MANOR, COULBY MANOR WAY, MIDDLESBROUGH, Middlesbrough II
Hemlington Hall Farmhouse  Farm Cottage and Garden Wall Listing NUNEATON DRIVE, HEMLINGTON, MIDDLESBROUGH, Middlesbrough II
Stable & Cart Shed, EAST OF HEMLINGTON HALL FARMHOUSE Listing CIRCA 20 METRES EAST OF HEMLINGTON HALL FARMHOUSE, NUNEATON DRIVE, HEMLINGTON, MIDDLESBROUGH, Middlesbrough II
Dorman Memorial Museum Listing PARK ROAD, MIDDLESBROUGH, Middlesbrough II
Cenotaph with Memorial Gates, Gatepiers & Screen Walls Listing PARK ROAD, MIDDLESBROUGH, Middlesbrough II
Memorial Clock, Albert Park Listing ALBERT PARK, PARK ROAD, MIDDLESBROUGH, Middlesbrough II
Sundial, Albert Park Listing ALBERT PARK, PARK ROAD, MIDDLESBROUGH, Middlesbrough II
Nazareth House Listing PARK ROAD NORTH, MIDDLESBROUGH, Middlesbrough II
Church of St. Barnabas Listing ST. BARNABAS ROAD, MIDDLESBROUGH, Middlesbrough II
Coffin in grounds of Dorman Museum Listing PARK ROAD, MIDDLESBROUGH, Middlesbrough II
Avenue Methodist Church Listing THE AVENUE, MIDDLESBROUGH, Middlesbrough II
Church of the Sacred Heart Listing LINTHORPE ROAD, MIDDLESBROUGH, Middlesbrough II
West Lodge and attached screen wall and Memorial in Albert Park Listing PARK ROAD, MIDDLESBROUGH, Middlesbrough II
South African War Memorial Listing ALBERT PARK, PARK ROAD, MIDDLESBROUGH, Middlesbrough II
Albert Park Park and Garden ALBERT PARK, Middlesbrough II
Bonny Grove Farmhouse Listing BRASS CASTLE LANE, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Gunnergate farmhouse and farm cottage Listing 80 AND 82, GUNNERGATE LANE, MIDDLESBROUGH, II
Memorial to Captain James Cook Listing CIRCA 80 METRES SOUTH OF CAPTAIN COOK BIRTHPLACE MUSEUM, STEWART PARK, MARTON, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Coach House, Stable and Screen Wall Listing CIRCA 10 METRES NORTH EAST OF WESTSIDE HOUSE, STOKESLEY ROAD, MARTON, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Armstrong/Ingledew Fenison Tombstone Listing CIRCA 10 METRES EAST OF CHURCH OF ST CUTHBERT, STOKESLEY ROAD, MARTON, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Wright Tombstone Listing CIRCA 4 METRES SOUTH OF SOUTH PORCH OF CHURCH OF ST CUTHBERT, STOKESLEY ROAD, MARTON, MIDDLESBROUGH II
LOGGIA Listing LOGGIA CIRCA 20 METRES SOUTH OF CAPTAIN COOK BIRTHPLACE MUSEUM, STEWART PARK, MARTON, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Westside House Listing STOKESLEY ROAD, MARTON, MIDDLESBROUGH, Middlesbrough II
Bolckow Tombstones, Grave Cover and Kerb Listing CIRCA 24 METRES EAST OF CHANCEL OF CHURCH OF ST CUTHBERT, STOKESLEY ROAD, MARTON, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Barn and Stable Listing 15M. EAST OF GUNNERGATE FARMHOUSE, GUNNERGATE LANE, MIDDLESBROUGH, Middlesbrough II
Davison Tombstone Listing CIRCA 6 METRES SOUTH OF SOUTH TRANCEPT OF CHURCH OF ST CUTHBERT, STOKESLEY ROAD, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Temple Listing CIRCA 150 METRES SOUTH WEST OF CAPTAIN COOK BIRTHPLACE MUSEUM, STEWART PARK, MARTON, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Church of St. Cuthbert Listing STOKESLEY ROAD, MARTON, MIDDLESBROUGH, Middlesbrough II*
Davison Tombstone Listing CIRCA 5 METRES SOUTH OF SOUTH TRANSEPT OF CHURCH OF ST CUTHBERT, STOKESLEY ROAD, MARTON, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Captain Cook School and School House Listing THE GROVE, MARTON, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Stewart Park Depot Listing STEWART PARK, MARTON,MIDDLESBROUGH II
Newham Hall, Retaining Wall and Steps Listing BRASS CASTLE LANE, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Gate, Gatepiers and Walls at Entrance to Newham Hall Listing BRASS CASTLE LANE, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Newham Hall Lodge Listing BRASS CASTLE LANE, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Newport Bridge Listing TEES (NEWPORT) BRIDGE APPROACH ROAD, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Tower Dance Studio (was Phoenix Squash Club) Listing NEWPORT ROAD, MIDDLESBROUGH, Middlesbrough II
Church of The Holy Trinity Listing JAMES STREET, NORTH ORMESBY, MIDDLESBROUGH II
No name for this Entry Listing 4, WEST SIDE, NUNTHORPE VILLAGE, Nunthorpe, Middlesbrough II
No name for this Entry Listing 8 AND 10, WEST SIDE, NUNTHORPE VILLAGE, Nunthorpe, Middlesbrough II
No name for this Entry Listing 1, EAST SIDE, NUNTHORPE VILLAGE, Nunthorpe, Middlesbrough II
Nunthorpe Hall Listing EAST SIDE, NUNTHORPE VILLAGE, Nunthorpe, Middlesbrough II
Gates, Gatepiers and Crescent Walls at Entrance to Nunthorpe Hall Listing EAST SIDE, NUNTHORPE VILLAGE, NUNTHORPEMIDDLESBROUGH II
Tree Bridge Listing NUNTHORPE VILLAGE, NUNTHORPE, MIDDLESBROUGH II
The Lodge Listing 30 STOKESLEY ROAD, NUNTHORPE, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Grey Towers House (Poole Hospital) and attached wall Listing STOKESLEY ROAD, NUNTHORPE, MIDDLESBROUGH II*
Church of St. Mary Listing CHURCH LANE, NUNTHORPE, MIDDLESBROUGH II
The Vicarage Listing CHURCH LANE, NUNTHORPE, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Lychgate and Adjoining Stile, Fence and Gate Listing C45M SOUTH-WEST OF CHURCH OF ST MARY, CHURCH LANE, NUNTHORPE, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Garden Terrace Wall, Stairs and Steps Listing GROUNDS OF NUNTHORPE HALL, EAST SIDE, NUNTHORPE VILLAGE, NUNTHORPE, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Chapel of St. Mary Listing GROUNDS OF NUNTHORPE HALL, EAST SIDE, NUNTHORPE VILLAGE, NUNTHORPE, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Gatepiers at Entrance to The Lodge and Poole Hospital Listing STOKESLEY ROAD, Nunthorpe, Middlesbrough II
No name for this Entry Listing 6, WEST SIDE, NUNTHORPE VILLAGE, NUNTHORPE, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Earthworks at Nunthorpe Hall Scheduling NUNTHORPE, MIDDLESBROUGH
No name for this Entry Listing 57-61, HIGH STREET, ORMESBY, MIDDLESBROUGH II
No name for this Entry Listing 33-55, HIGH STREET, ORMESBY, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Captain Cook Public House Listing DURHAM STREET, MIDDLESBROUGH II
No name for this Entry Listing 2,3 AND 4, EXCHANGE PLACE, MIDDLESBROUGH, Middlesbrough II
Transporter Bridge Listing TRANSPORTER BRIDGE, PORT CLARENCE ROAD, Billingham, Stockton-on-Tees II*
New Exchange Buildings Listing QUEENS SQUARE, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Queens Square Listing QUEENS TERRACE, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Cathedral House Listing SUSSEX STREET, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Transporter Bridge Listing TRANSPORTER BRIDGE, FERRY ROAD, MIDDLESBROUGH II*
Piers, Railings and Gates at Entrance to Transporter Bridge Listing FERRY ROAD, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Winch House, Adjoining Railings, Wall, Gates and Gatepiers Listing C.40M SOUTH WEST OF TRANSPORTER BRIDGE, FERRY ROAD, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Bridgekeepers House Listing FERRY ROAD, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Old Town Hall Listing MARKET PLACE, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Customs House Listing NORTH STREET, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Cleveland Pub, Area Walls, Piers and Railings Listing CLEVELAND STREET, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Dock Clock Tower Listing DOCK STREET, MIDDLESBROUGH II*
Boundary Wall at Entrance to Davy Offshore Modules LTD Listing VULCAN STREET, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Clock Tower Listing C5M SOUTH-WEST OF OLD TOWN HALL, MARKET PLACE, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Cleveland Buildings Listing CLEVELAND STREET, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Queens Square Listing 17-27, QUEENS TERRACE, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Stainton House Listing 2 HEMLINGTON ROAD, STAINTON AND THORNTON, MIDDLESBROUGH II
The Stainton Public House Listing MELDYKE LANE, STAINTON AND THORNTON, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Church of St. Peter and St. Paul Listing THORNTON ROAD, STAINTON AND THORNTON, MIDDLESBROUGH II*
Coffin Listing ONE M.SOUTH OF CHANCEL OF CHURCH OF ST. PETER AND ST. PAUL, THORNTON ROAD, STAINTON AND THORNTON, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Corner Tombstone Listing 7M. WEST OF CHURCH OF ST. PETER AND ST. PAUL, THORNTON ROAD, STAINTON AND THORNTON, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Low Farmhouse 2 Farm Cottages and Adjoining Outbuildings Listing 2 THORNTON ROAD, STAINTON AND THORNTON, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Church View Listing CHURCH VIEW, 1 HEMLINGTON ROAD, STAINTON AND THORNTON, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Pair of Dovecotes and Linking Outhouse Listing C.20M NORTH-WEST OF STAINTON VALE FARMHOUSE, LOW LANE, STAINTON AND THORNTON, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Rennison Tombstone Listing 3M SOUTH OF CHANCEL OF CHURCH OF ST. PETER AND ST. PAUL, THORNTON ROAD, STAINTON AND THORNTON, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Boundary Wall, Gates and Gatepiers Listing CHURCH OF ST. PETER AND ST. PAUL, THORNTON ROAD, STAINTON AND THORNTON, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Stainton Vale Farmhouse Listing LOW LINE, STAINTON, Stainton and Thornton, Middlesbrough II
Memorial Hall Listing MELDYKE LANE, STAINTON AND THORNTON, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Stainton Grange and Garden Walls Listing STAINTON WAY, STAINTON AND THORNTON, MIDDLESBROUGH II*
Burdon Table Tomb Listing 4M EAST OF CHANCEL OF CHURCH OF ST. PETER AND ST. PAUL, THORNTON ROAD, STAINTON AND THORNTON, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Walls, Gates and Gatepiers Listing TO GARDEN OF NO 15 THORNTON ROAD, STAINTON AND THORNTON, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Town Hall and Municipal Buildings Listing CORPORATION ROAD, MIDDLESBROUGH II*
Darlington Building Society Listing 29 AND 31, CORPORATION ROAD, MIDDLESBROUGH II
The Shakespeare Listing THE SHAKESPEARE, 34, LINTHORPE ROAD, MIDDLESBROUGH, Middlesbrough II
Monument to Sir Samuel Sadler Listing MONUMENT TO SIR SAMUEL SADLER, VICTORIA SQUARE, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Hippodrome (was Chicago Rock) Listing WILSON STREET, MIDDLESBROUGH II
No name for this Entry Listing 11 AND 13, ZETLAND ROAD, MIDDLESBROUGH, Middlesbrough II
Central Public Library Listing VICTORIA SQUARE, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Zetland Hotel Listing ZETLAND HOTEL, 9, ZETLAND ROAD, MIDDLESBROUGH, Middlesbrough II
Railway Station with Shops, Offices and Two Bridges Listing ZETLAND ROAD, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Nos 2, 2A, 4 and Zetland Buildings Listing EXCHANGE SQUARE, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Exchange House Listing 6 EXCHANGE SQUARE, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Monument to H.W.F.BOLCKOW Listing EXCHANGE SQUARE, MIDDLESBROUGH II
No name for this Entry Listing 36-42, LINTHORPE ROAD, MIDDLESBROUGH, Middlesbrough II
Midland Bank Listing 141 LINTHORPE ROAD, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Church of St. John the Evangelist Listing MARTON ROAD, MIDDLESBROUGH II*
No name for this Entry Listing 1, ALBERT ROAD, MIDDLESBROUGH, Middlesbrough II
Trustee Savings Bank Listing 34 ALBERT ROAD, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Old High School, University of Teesside Listing Borough Road, MIDDLESBROUGH, Middlesbrough II
Constantine Building, University of Teesside Listing University of Teesside, Borough Road, MIDDLESBROUGH, Middlesbrough II
Church of St Columba Listing BOUNDARY ROAD, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Group of 5 Telephone Kiosks Listing EAST SIDE OF TOWN HALL, CORPORATION ROAD, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Church of All Saints Listing LINTHORPE ROAD, MIDDLESBROUGH II*
Gates, Gatepiers and Boundary/Retaining Walls to Railway Station Forecourt including Commercial Premises Listing ZETLAND ROAD, MIDDLESBROUGH, Middlesbrough II
No name for this Entry Listing 7, ZETLAND ROAD, MIDDLESBROUGH, Middlesbrough II*
Forbes’ Buildings Listing LINTHORPE ROAD, MIDDLESBROUGH II
The Masham Hotel Listing 27 LINTHORPE ROAD, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Monument to John Vaughan Listing VICTORIA SQUARE, MIDDLESBROUGH II
No name for this Entry Listing 1, 3 AND 5, ZETLAND ROAD, MIDDLESBROUGH, Middlesbrough II
Commerce House Listing EXCHANGE SQUARE, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Park Methodist Church Listing LINTHORPE ROAD, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Lloyds Bank Chambers Listing 2 ALBERT ROAD, MIDDLESBROUGH II
The Albert Listing 38 AND 40, ALBERT ROAD, MIDDLESBROU II
York House Listing 102-108, BOROUGH ROAD, MIDDLESBROUGH II
The Empire Listing CORPORATION ROAD, MIDDLESBROUG II*
Midland Bank Listing MIDLAND BANK, 1, EXCHANGE PLACE, MIDDLESBROUGH, Middlesbrough II
Gates, Gatepiers and Flanking Walls Listing ENTRANCE TO NAZARETH HOUSE, PARK ROAD NORTH, MIDDLESBROUG II
Former Primary Infant School Listing VICTORIA ROAD, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Church House Listing MARTON ROAD, MIDDLESBROUGH II
Barn, Horse-Mill, Stable and Cartshed Listing C.10M NORTH-WEST OF BONNY GROVE FARMHOUSE, BRASS CASTLE LANE, MIDDLESBROUG II
Stainsby medieval village and open field system Scheduling Middlesbrough

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Coffin in the grounds of Dorman Museum

Nature's World Community Orchard

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Originally introduced by the Romans, apples have been cared for and cultivated for centuries, yet today orchards are in decline.

Orchards are important because:

  • They create beautiful landscapes
  • Fruit tress are a source of food
  • They are valuable habitats for wildlife
  • Locally grown fruit provides local jobs, reduces transport costs and pollution
  • Old varieties of fruit and fruit trees are irreplaceable sources of genetic diversity
  • Orchards have a long tradition of multiple use spaces
  • They are places of local cultural significance

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Nature’s World Community Orchard was managed organically (without the use of synthetic pesticides and soluble fertilizers). Pest and disease control was reliant on creating a diverse environment and encouraging maximum levels of natural predators.

Despite the closure of Nature’s World in 2013, the heritage community orchard is still a beautiful place, rich with hundreds of specimens of apple, plum and pear trees.

Friends of Nature’s World requested that Middlesbrough Borough Council place Tree Protection Orders on these trees, but we were told that the trees on the site are not outstanding fully-mature specimen trees and in themselves would not warrant Tree Preservation Orders.

Apparently, it is not usual practice for cropping trees to be protected under Tree Preservation Orders, though there have been some instances of very rare cropped trees to be so protected. This is dependant on their rarity and specialist advice would have to be taken as it involves a highly specialised investigation of the seeds (“pips”) to determine whether such cropped trees are worthy of Tree Preservation Order status.

On the Nature’s World site, there are a number of trees which were adopted by members of the public who paid to maintain a tree. There are also a number of memorial trees to which the public can not access.

Friends of Nature’s World hope that by maintaining the site for as long as required, eventually the public will be allowed access to the orchards once again.

Listed below are the types of apple, pear and plum tree found at Nature’s World.

Apples Outer Ring (Clockwise from entrance)

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Howgate Wonder

Laxtons Superb

James Grieve

Tydemans Late Orange

Sparton

Kidd’s Orange Red

Norfolk Beefing

Besspool

Forge

Autumn Pearmain

Beeley Pippin

Allen’s Everlasting

Pitmaston Pineapple

Catshead

White Transparent

Melon

Herring Pippin

Tom Putt

White Melrose

Sheeps Nose

Nettlestone Pippin

Keswick Codling

Tydemans Early Worcester

Worcester Pearmain

Crispin

Sunset

Winston

Apples Inner Ring (Clockwise from entrance)

Cockpit Improved

Grenadier

Greensleeves

George Cave

John Downie

Red Ellison’s

Monarch

Fortune

Rev W Wilks

Golden Delicious

Lord Lambourne

Court Pendu Plat

Golden Spire

Golden Hornet

Fiesta

Epicure

Jupiter

Brownlee’s Russet

Ellison’s Orange

Lord Derby

Egremont Russet

Blenheim Orange

Balsam

Bramley’s Seedling

Beauty of Bath

Cheal’s Scarlet

Discovery

Early Victoria

Arthur Turner

Early Worcester

Dartmouth

Charles Ross

Newton Wonder

Lane’s Prince Albert

Keswick Codling

Veitch’s Scarlet

Cox’s Orange Pippin

Ashmeads’s Kernel

Allington Pippin

Pears (Clockwise from entrance)

Beth

Buerre Hardy

Catillac

Concorde

Conference

Doyenne Du Cornice

Hessle

Jargonelle

Louise Bonne of Jersey

Onwards

Packham’s Triumph

William’s Bon Chretien

Glou Morcheau

Hessle

Glou Morcheau

William’s Bon Chretien

Packham’s Triumph

Onwards

Louise Bonne of Jersey

Jargonelle

Hessle

Doyenne Du Comice

Conference

Concorde

Catillac

Buerre Hardy

Beth

Plums (Clockwise from entrance)

Victoria

Early Rivers

Greengage

Goldfinch

Reine Claude D’Bavay

Cambridge Gage

Czar

Belle De Louvain

Laxtons Cropper

Merryweather

Witherslack Damson

Rivers Early Prolific

Count D’ Althan’s Gage

Angelina Burdett

 

Information was taken from an original Nature’s World leaflet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ALL WE WANT FOR CHRISTMAS IS…WEEDS!

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On 27th December, Friends of Nature’s World spent a cold morning weeding the Nature’s World car park.

FoNW obtained a variety of tools to use for the day, thanks to a volunteer group in South Middlesbrough. Despite the icy conditions, the group made good use of the wheel barrows, spades and secateurs.

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It was hoped that Middlesbrough Council would see the groups dedication to maintaining the site (even at Christmas) and how hopeful they are that the New Year will offer new opportunities for the Nature’s World site.

possibilities are endlessThe group aims to maintain the grounds until a suitable plan is accepted by Middlesbrough Council. It is hoped that by raising the profile of the site, potential investors, charities, community groups and the public will be reminded what an asset it is to the local community and Middlesbrough as a whole. There are not many places where children can actively learn about nature and the environment.

Allegedly, there is currently a £1.6 million pounds debt owed to the National Lottery which would have to be paid back by an investor if the council is to sell the land commercially. If Nature’s World is transferred to benefit the community (community asset transfer) or to a charity then the debt would be cancelled out.

This is probably why there has been little interest in Nature’s World since its closure. To a housing developer, £1.6 million would still be a worthwhile cost for a 26 acre site.

Despite not being allocated for new housing in the Local Plan, it could still be sold for a developer to land bank.

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Friends of Nature’s World are optimistic that they can promote the benefits of Nature’s World and look after the site on a voluntary basis for as long as it takes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Heritage at Risk-English Heritage Event

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“Successful partnerships, and the support of volunteers and community groups are crucial in tackling heritage at risk; a fact demonstrated consistently in the North East. Whilst we’ve been very successful in improving many sites, there is no time to relax – 20 historic sites and areas were newly assessed and added to the 2014 register. We will continue to work with others to improve the condition of our historic environment”

Graham Saunders, Planning and Conservation Director for the North East

On Tuesday 9th December 2014, English Heritage held an “Heritage at Risk” event at the Castlegate Centre in Newcastle.

A representative from Hands on Middlesbrough was invited to meet with other community and voluntary groups and discuss how they can work together to support heritage at risk in the North East of England.

The purpose of the event was to:

  • Increase knowledge about what the heritage at risk programme is;
  • Provide more understanding amongst local community groups about how they can support heritage at risk in their local area;
  • Provide a better awareness of what funding support is available from organisations like English Heritage and the Heritage Lottery Fund;
  • Provide greater familiarity of what fundraising support is available from organisations like the Heritage Alliance – e.g. funding workshops, project mentoring, webinars and consultancy support
  • Develop awareness and increase confidence and knowledge about who to contact for help and advice

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On 1st April 2015, English Heritage are splitting into two separate organisations. English Heritage will concentrate on running the 420 properties they manage and Historic England will act as an independent government body, advising government, local authority and carrying out research into England’s historic environment. Historic England will be asking community groups to survey Grade II listed buildings and record their condition.

English Heritage currently maintain Grade I and Grade II* listed buildings, despite 92% of listed buildings in England are Grade II.

In Middlesbrough, our only one Grade I listed building is Acklam Hall, Grade II* buildings are Middlesbrough Town Hall, St Cuthbert Church (Marton), Church of St Peter & St Paul (Stainton), St John The Evangelist Church, All Saints Church, 7 Zetland Road, Dock Clock Tower, Transporter Bridge, Grey Towers House (Nunthorpe) & The Empire. Many significant buildings are Grade II and are in poor condition.

Community groups can help protect historic buildings and raise funds from a number of sources; heritage lottery fund, heritage alliance, architectural heritage fund, Local Buildings Preservation Trust, Princes Regeneration Trust and many more.

The event was informative, especially for fledgling community groups. There were guest speakers from Heritage Lottery Fund, English Heritage, North of England Civic Trust and Tyne & Wear Building Preservation Trust.

There was also an open workshop where groups could discuss with a member of staff from English Heritage any problems or challenges facing community groups getting involved with heritage at risk, fundraising support, funding, training, information and advice.

The workshop highlighted some key problems facing community groups who are trying to protect heritage at risk. One of the main concerns raised was how English Heritage can protect buildings, structures and monuments particularly from housing development on the grounds of listed buildings when cuts to local government (conservation officers, heritage officers and archaeology services) has led to heritage and conservation moving further down the list of priorities.

In Middlesbrough, it is important the community identify the buildings, structures, monuments and gardens we want to keep, think creatively about how buildings can be used for modern purposes, raise funds and work together with the local authority to protect our heritage above and below the ground. There are funds available for setting up a group to champion heritage, for restoration projects and for heritage projects that benefit communities.

The Heritage Lottery Fund was set up in 1994 and has given 5.8 billion to Heritage Projects in the UK. Community groups can easily apply for funds, projects for over £10,000 must demonstrate one outcome for heritage and one for people.

The historic environment is all around us and it is our responsibility to make it a priority to preserve what we can for future generations. Communities need to work with the local authority and organisations like English Heritage to ensure heritage is given the respect it deserves.

Hands on Middlesbrough has signed up to help Historic England next year record the condition of all Grade II listed buildings in Middlesbrough.

 

Photographs provided by Local Historian, Ian Stubbs

 

Friends of Nature's World Granted Access by Middlesbrough Council

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On Sunday 14th December, Friends of Nature’s World held their first meeting at the Nature’s World site, after being granted monthly access to maintain the 26 acres.

The group has been set up to maintain Nature’s World and demonstrate that the community wants to keep this resource. It is hoped that the Friends of Nature’s World can promote the importance of green space within Middlesbrough and that the spaces that are important to communities should be protected and preserved for future generations to enjoy.

It is hoped that through this group forming, Nature’s World can be revitalised, raise the profile and awareness of the site, attract potential investors and stop it from falling into disrepair.

There are very few places where children can learn about local wildlife, growing organic food and the environment. Nature’s World encouraged a “hands on” approach to learning and was a valuable resource to a number of community groups.
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It was discussed at the first meeting onsite, that there are a number of possibilities to use the land to benefit the community once again.

As Nature’s World is not identified in the local plan it means that legally it can not be sold for housing until 2029. It is possible it could be sold to a developer to land bank or sold off in sections to build 10 homes or less. With enough public support for the campaign, it is hoped that the land can be re-opened and a suitable alternative to housing found.

Friends of Nature’s World would like to appeal for volunteers to join the group and who can offer their time to maintain the site once a month. We are waiting to hear from Middlesbrough Council if some volunteers will  be granted weekly access, as monthly access on a site that size will not be sufficient.

Please contact us: lovenaturesworld@gmail.com

FRIENDS OF NATURE'S WORLD REVEAL THE ADVENTURE PLAYGROUND

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On Saturday 8th November 2014, Hands On Middlesbrough and Friends of Nature’s World were given access for 2 hours to carry out maintenance of the play areas at Nature’s World and to pick any apples that may be left in the heritage orchards (unfortunately there were none left).

A group of about 15 people turned out in torrential rain. The weeds in the Adventure Playground were knee high and despite having no equipment, the volunteers pulled the weeds out by hand.

Some of the people who came to help had once worked at Nature’s World, some used to visit frequently with their families and had many fond memories.

Botanist, Ann Press came along to visit her Forest Garden, one of the oldest forest gardens in the UK and home to a number of rare plants, including a rare Lady Slipper Orchid. Some of the species of plants were replanted at ancient sites around the UK.

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Nature’s World was a much loved place to visit. A place for scientific study and for adults and children to learn about nature and the environment. A beautiful green space in Middlesbrough and one that needs to be protected.

Gazette Article Tidy Work Down at Nature’s World