Nature's World Community Orchard

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Originally introduced by the Romans, apples have been cared for and cultivated for centuries, yet today orchards are in decline.

Orchards are important because:

  • They create beautiful landscapes
  • Fruit tress are a source of food
  • They are valuable habitats for wildlife
  • Locally grown fruit provides local jobs, reduces transport costs and pollution
  • Old varieties of fruit and fruit trees are irreplaceable sources of genetic diversity
  • Orchards have a long tradition of multiple use spaces
  • They are places of local cultural significance

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Nature’s World Community Orchard was managed organically (without the use of synthetic pesticides and soluble fertilizers). Pest and disease control was reliant on creating a diverse environment and encouraging maximum levels of natural predators.

Despite the closure of Nature’s World in 2013, the heritage community orchard is still a beautiful place, rich with hundreds of specimens of apple, plum and pear trees.

Friends of Nature’s World requested that Middlesbrough Borough Council place Tree Protection Orders on these trees, but we were told that the trees on the site are not outstanding fully-mature specimen trees and in themselves would not warrant Tree Preservation Orders.

Apparently, it is not usual practice for cropping trees to be protected under Tree Preservation Orders, though there have been some instances of very rare cropped trees to be so protected. This is dependant on their rarity and specialist advice would have to be taken as it involves a highly specialised investigation of the seeds (“pips”) to determine whether such cropped trees are worthy of Tree Preservation Order status.

On the Nature’s World site, there are a number of trees which were adopted by members of the public who paid to maintain a tree. There are also a number of memorial trees to which the public can not access.

Friends of Nature’s World hope that by maintaining the site for as long as required, eventually the public will be allowed access to the orchards once again.

Listed below are the types of apple, pear and plum tree found at Nature’s World.

Apples Outer Ring (Clockwise from entrance)

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Howgate Wonder

Laxtons Superb

James Grieve

Tydemans Late Orange

Sparton

Kidd’s Orange Red

Norfolk Beefing

Besspool

Forge

Autumn Pearmain

Beeley Pippin

Allen’s Everlasting

Pitmaston Pineapple

Catshead

White Transparent

Melon

Herring Pippin

Tom Putt

White Melrose

Sheeps Nose

Nettlestone Pippin

Keswick Codling

Tydemans Early Worcester

Worcester Pearmain

Crispin

Sunset

Winston

Apples Inner Ring (Clockwise from entrance)

Cockpit Improved

Grenadier

Greensleeves

George Cave

John Downie

Red Ellison’s

Monarch

Fortune

Rev W Wilks

Golden Delicious

Lord Lambourne

Court Pendu Plat

Golden Spire

Golden Hornet

Fiesta

Epicure

Jupiter

Brownlee’s Russet

Ellison’s Orange

Lord Derby

Egremont Russet

Blenheim Orange

Balsam

Bramley’s Seedling

Beauty of Bath

Cheal’s Scarlet

Discovery

Early Victoria

Arthur Turner

Early Worcester

Dartmouth

Charles Ross

Newton Wonder

Lane’s Prince Albert

Keswick Codling

Veitch’s Scarlet

Cox’s Orange Pippin

Ashmeads’s Kernel

Allington Pippin

Pears (Clockwise from entrance)

Beth

Buerre Hardy

Catillac

Concorde

Conference

Doyenne Du Cornice

Hessle

Jargonelle

Louise Bonne of Jersey

Onwards

Packham’s Triumph

William’s Bon Chretien

Glou Morcheau

Hessle

Glou Morcheau

William’s Bon Chretien

Packham’s Triumph

Onwards

Louise Bonne of Jersey

Jargonelle

Hessle

Doyenne Du Comice

Conference

Concorde

Catillac

Buerre Hardy

Beth

Plums (Clockwise from entrance)

Victoria

Early Rivers

Greengage

Goldfinch

Reine Claude D’Bavay

Cambridge Gage

Czar

Belle De Louvain

Laxtons Cropper

Merryweather

Witherslack Damson

Rivers Early Prolific

Count D’ Althan’s Gage

Angelina Burdett

 

Information was taken from an original Nature’s World leaflet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Love Nature's World, Uncategorized.